Holiday in Seville.

I had a lovely week in Seville the week before last.  It is situated on the Guadalquivir river, or Wad Al Quivir, as I discovered whilst visiting the Roman ruins under the metropol parasol, or Las Setas, designed by a German architect, Jürgen Mayer, and claiming to be the world’s largest wooden structure. It is very impressive, and slightly surreal amongst the old streets of Seville.

I went with a vegan friend, and it was quite difficult to find a variety of things that she could eat.  She survived mainly on gazpacho, chips and salad. We found 3 places that had a little more variety, slightly different to the usual – one was Toc Toc Tapas, another was El Enano Verde, and the other was Puro & Bio which was our favourite as not only did they do rice milk ice cream, they made great mojitos too.

El Alcázar de Sevilla is amazing, and a must. I can´t say the same for the horse and cart rides around the city.  I felt so sorry for the horses being plagued by flies and hanging around in the 48-degree heat for hours on end.

We really enjoyed the river cruise and the hop on hop off bus. A tip we were given by DJ who was selling the tickets, you can use it for 24 hours, so if you buy it at 4pm one day you can use it until 4pm the next day – and we were allowed to use it until 10pm the following day.

We went over to Triana one evening for some drinks and tapas with friends and had a lovely evening. That was when I spoke the most Spanish, and I really enjoyed it. So much so that we went back the following evening.

We went to a flamenco show (how touristy of us) at La Casa de La Guitarra which was excellent, with Pepe León El Ecijano, singing, Carmelo Picón on guitar (amazing) and a dancer. That and the evening in Triana were the best parts for me.

CAT tools

I have just finished my assignment on CAT tools and had to use MateCat as part of it.  I really didn’t expect to like translation technology.  I thought that they may make a translator redundant. However, I love technology in general, so it’s no surprise that I can see that I will also love translation technology in time and as I become better acquainted with it.

It does take a different set of skills though than human translation, as it is more like editing the machine output that actually translating the source text. I can see that it won’t be suitable for all types of texts either, as it won’t be able to cope with poetry or more literary texts. It’s quite difficult at first to get used to seeing the text in segments, and I noticed that my usual habit of reading the source text completely and then again as I am working through it, and pondering on what it means in context, how to approach it etc. didn’t happen when using the CAT tool, it was simply editing the English output compared to a very short segment of original text. It felt a bit like working on a production line. It will be useful for projects for marketing, and for clients who use specialist vocabulary though, as the translation memory will remember things so I don’t have to.

It’s quite difficult at first to get used to seeing the text in segments, and I noticed that my usual habit of reading the source text through completely and then again as I am working through it didn’t happen when using the CAT tool, it was simply editing the English output compared to a very short segment of original text. I will have to ensure that I read the original completely before loading it in future. It will be useful for projects for marketing, and for clients who use specialist vocabulary though, as the translation memory will remember things so I don’t have to. Is that a bonus? Will it make me lazy?

How NOT to study

I have spent all day today (Sunday) playing catch up – as I have done absolutely no studying for ages. I have an assignment to be in by Thursday, so it has to be submitted on Wednesday as I am going to holiday to Seville on Thursday. Luckily I have taken all of next week off work, so I will have time to finish everything (just), but I remember doing the same thing last year to finish my BA – taking PTO in order to study and finish assignments.

It’s not a great way to do things. You feel as if you are constantly working (probably because you are), and all the times that you spent messing around and not studying when you knew you should feel like a waste, as you are giving up precious PTO to make up for it. I guess it takes as many hours as it takes, no matter when they are, spare time after work/weekends, or PTO. However, come Thursday I WON’T CARE about any of it for around 10 days as I am off to Sevilla!

¡Cuantas ganas tengo! ¡Qué emoción! Which reminds me of a song – for me it is about Spain (well, not all of it) 😉

Vieras cuantas ganas tengo

Life is hard for native lingua francans learning new languages. But why do they do it at all?

An interesting blog entry ( by  ) about why native English speakers learn foreign languages

“I believe that by reaching out and learning another peoples’ language, I’m increasing the net empathy of the human race. I’m taking off my shoes and trying on yours so that one less person thinks their shoes are the truth. By learning a language, we’re making humans care about each other, one word at a time.”

http://blogs.transparent.com/language-news/2017/06/05/the-curse-of-the-lingua-franca/

My OED word of the day…the world needs more of this.

The world needs bayanihan

bayanihan, n.

[‘ A traditional system of mutual assistance in which the members of a community work together to accomplish a difficult task. In later use also: a spirit of civic unity and cooperation among Filipinos.’]

Pronunciation: Brit. /bʌɪəˈniːhan/, U.S. /ˌbaɪəˈniˌhæn/, Philippine English /ˌbɑɪˌjɑˈniˌhɑn/

Origin:A borrowing from Tagalog. Etymon: Tagalog bayanihan.

Etymology: < Tagalog bayanihan < bayani to work unpaid + -han, suffix forming nouns denoting reciprocal or mutual action.

Philippine English.

A traditional system of mutual assistance in which the members of a community work together to accomplish a difficult task. In later use also: a spirit of civic unity and cooperation among Filipinos.

1958 Washington Post 21 June d6/3 Bayanihan is an ancient island custom, symbolic of cooperative group work.

1978 Y. Hayami Anat. Peasant Econ. ii. 14 When children marry, instead of living in parents’ farms..they move to bamboo and nipa huts built by bayanihan.

2000 Teaching Tolerance Fall 3/1 Residents of Palo Alto, Calif., have adopted the Filipino meme of bayanihan to express their own spirit of cooperation and shared responsibility.

2015 Manila Times(Nexis) 26 Dec., Upholding the tradition of bayanihan..let us lend cheer where it is needed most and come to the aid of the downcast.